Underpainting the Glow in Watercolor

Take your watercolors to the next level by mastering glazing of your underpaintings to produce lively, rich and glowing paintings that have depth and color interplay. Underpainting is the process of applying numerous glazes of different hues of paint, one on top of another, to achieve a depth of color that is not achievable with any other method of application. Glazing in watercolor requires that the individual layers of paint dry before each successive layer is applied. Because of watercolor’s transparent properties, the paint mixes optically, as opposed to the hue being mixed on the paper or palette. A shimmering, almost iridescent look materializes, grabbing the attention of the viewer in a way that other methods of application can not.Once your underpainting is produced, local color can be applied. The glazed underpainting will continue to be visible, giving the local color a vibrant, glowing finish. This course will utilize a floral image, however, the technique is useful for virtually any subject matter, including portraits, landscape, still life and even abstracts.  Join our class today and start putting into practice the traditional and relevant technique of glazing your underpaintings and have the description ‘glowing’ associated with your work.

Start Date:

October 7, 2014

Course Length:

4 weeks

Tuition:

$169.99

$149.99

Instructor:

Cheryle Chapline (bio)

Course Materials (Included in Tuition):

View Course Schedule

Register


WHAT YOU’LL LEARN:

  • Techniques and tips for achieving bright underpainting
  • How to glaze in watercolor
  • How to mix colors effectively
  • Tips for creating an alluring glow to your watercolor compositions

WHO SHOULD TAKE THIS COURSE:

  • Intermediate watercolorists with a background in painting
  • Advanced watercolorists looking to brush up their underpainting approach

ART SUPPLIES YOU’LL NEED:

Winsor & Newton Watercolor Paint (professional, transparent…not gouache, not student grade & not Cotman brand.
There are many pigments available…I have found W&N paint to be exceptional. Daniel Smith, Holbein and Maimeri are also exceptional brands that I use. Do not try to get by with a sub-par brand, as you will be disappointed with the results and frustrated with the process.)

  • Aureolin Yellow
  • Cobalt Blue
  • Permanent Rose
  • French Ultramarine Blue
  • Burnt Sienna
  • Permanent Alizarin Crimson
  • New Gamboge, or Quinacridone Gold
  • Winsor Red  or Cadmium Red

1 or 2 sheets (min.) of Arches 140# Cold Press Watercolor Paper, 22” x 30”
(The assignments can be done with only one sheet if you utilize ¼ or ½ sheet size each for the project and the exercise but recommend more for practice, redoing, additional painting, etc.)

Palette (Suggest John Pike Palette, large wells…this is the one I use in the video. However, there are many good palettes. I like this one for several reasons: it is virtually indestructible, it does not stain, it has a large open mixing area and a 2nd one that is even larger in the lid. Very important to have a tight fitting lid to cover the paint when not in use, otherwise it dries out and gets dusty.)

Brushes:

  • *1” Flat Synthetic (I use a 1” Winsor & Newton Aquarelle  #995 and a ¾” Jack Richeson #9010.  Another good and inexpensive choice is the 1” Royal Magestic Wash  #4250)
  •   ½” Flat Synthetic (same brands as for 1” flats)
  •   1½” Flat Synthetic (Jack Richeson #9010 is a very good one)
  • *#14 or 16  Round Synthetic (I use two of these at a time, suggest either Royal Majestic # 4250 or Robert Simmons Saphire S60, which is a comb of natural and synthetic, thus holds more water)
  • *#4 or #6 Round Synthetic with very good point (Royal Majestic #4250)
  • *Must have for this project, others recommended but not required.

Paper Towel (Viva is preferred as it doesn’t have a 3D pattern that would affect texture in wet paint.)

Kleenex Tissue (no lotion)

Two Water Containers (One for clean water, other for rinse water. I use two collapsible portable lightweight ones.)

1 Micro Fiber Towel/Dish Mat

1” Masking Tape

#2 Pencil (I like Ticonderoga brand)

Kneaded Eraser (I like Design brand)

Gator Board (Optional but recommended. Slightly larger (roughly additional ½”  on all edges) than the size of paper you are using.)

Many options are available from where to purchase these supplies. One very good source is cheapjoes.com. They are very reliable and you should be able to obtain almost all of above mentioned materials from them. If you plan to take additional classes from me, you might want to purchase a small bottle of Pebeo Drawing Gum (a liquid latex for use as a resist).


COURSE SYLLABUSRegister

Lesson One

Hello! My name is Cheryle Chapline. Welcome to my video studio and to your class on ‘Underpainting the Glow’ in watercolor.

We will be studying the process of producing an underpainting by a build-up of glazing in watercolor, or, in other words, the use of layering a hue on top of an already dried layer of a different hue. Glazing layer over layer in transparent watercolor gives the painter the opportunity to create a depth of color that has a shimmering, almost iridescent ‘glow’ that can not be achieved any other way. Consider a dried underglaze of Cobalt Blue over-glazed with Permanent Rose. The most exquisite lavender/purple magically appears, creating almost a life all it’s own. It is an optical mixing of the two colors combined with reflected light from the white paper below. Quite a bit different than a palette mix of those two colors and then applying the pigment to paper…it doesn’t have the intensity and vibrancy that the optical mix of the glazing has. Similar results could be said for a mixture of the two pigments on the paper, which does give the artist a much more lively, interesting combination of color than a palette mixture…it just doesn’t have the impact of a glazed optical mixture.

Assignments for Week One:
If you are new to watercolor or need a refresher on watercolor basics, watch the included bonus video (called Watercolor with Birgit O’Connor: Watercolor Basics) that accompanies this class. This watercolor basics video demonstrates the use of materials and techniques as close to those that I personally utilize that I could find. That being said, one very big difference is that we use different methods of mixing color, as I glaze colors and produce an underpainting while the Watercolor Basics video demonstrates color mixing on the paper. Our class is dealing primarily with glazing and underpainting and that technique is demonstrated in the proprietary video that I produced specifically for this class, Underpainting the Glow: Three Orange Tulips.

  • Read Lesson One (above)

 

  • View Underpainting the Glow: Three Orange Tulips – Part One, Underpainting Aureolin Yellow Video

 

  • Gather Materials (see supply list below)

 

  • Read Assignment 1: Color Play (Circles)  (below)

 

  • View the sample image of Assignment 1: Color Play (Circles) that is provided with this class. Produce a similar Color Play (Circles) painting on Arches Cold Press 140# Watercolor Paper (¼ or ½ of a 22” x 30” sheet) utilizing Aureolin Yellow, Cobalt Blue and Permanent Rose, allowing each glaze of color to dry before applying a new glaze of color. After painting all of the circles with various glazes of the above colors (thus, producing the underpainting), accent with the additional pigments on your palette to determine the effects each has being placed on top of the underpainting. [Specific instructions are detailed below in Assignment 1: Color Play (Circles)]
Assignments for Week Two

Choose a FLORAL subject matter that you wish to paint. If you want to work along with my demo on the video, it would be preferable for you to choose either orange, yellow or red-orange simple flowers. You should photograph your subject so that you will have a 2D image from which to work…working from life is always preferable but with objects that are perishable and a class that spans four weeks, you probably don’t want to be painting dead flowers in week four.  It would be best to photograph your subject while the sun is low in the sky so that you will have strong shadows and defined highlights, thus setting your painting up to really showcase the glazing and the underpainting effects. (The image that I produced to work from had a strong afternoon light shining through the tulips, creating an opportunity for me to glaze light, medium and dark values.)

Alternately, you may paint from my reference image for use as an educational exercise only. The image is available for download with this class.

When composing your painting, make sure to consider the Rule of Thirds and the placement of the center of interest (for more information go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_of_thirds). Try to make this painting about the flowers and the ‘glow’ within them.

Working from your own photographic reference (or my reference image), draw a line drawing of the image you wish to paint. Draw the image on quarter sheet of Arches Cold Press 140# Watercolor Paper (¼ of a 22” x 30” sheet)  You may draw it on a separate piece of paper and transfer it to the watercolor paper or you may draw it on watercolor paper at the on-set. If you draw the image directly on the watercolor paper, make sure that you are not too heavy handed in applying the pencil, otherwise the graphite might be difficult to remove. Use a Kneaded Eraser shaped like a little sausage to roll over the top of the watercolor paper to remove excess graphite before starting to paint.

Prepare your Palette & Workspace

Paint the Aureolin Yellow glaze on your painting, applying the techniques featured in Three Orange Tulips (Part One). While referring to your reference photo, paint as you follow along with the video, stopping and starting the video as necessary.

Allow the Aureolin Yellow glaze, Part One to naturally dry.

View Underpainting the Glow: Three Orange Tulips – Part Two, Underpainting Cobalt Blue Video

Paint the Cobalt Blue glaze on your painting, applying the techniques featured in Three Orange Tulips (Part Two). While referring to your reference photo, paint as you follow along with the video, stopping and starting the video as necessary.

Allow the Cobalt Blue glaze, Part Two to naturally dry.

Assignments for Week Three
View Underpainting the Glow: Three Orange Tulips – Part Three, Underpainting Permanent Rose and Local Color Video*  {*Note: If you find it laborious to watch every brush stroke, as it is very long, you may fast-forward through the part of the video that is referring to the application of Local Color (second part of Part Three). There is no audio instruction for this segment of the video, strictly visual.}

Paint the Permanent Rose glaze on your painting, applying the techniques featured in Three Orange Tulips (first part of Part Three). While referring to your reference photo, paint as you follow along with the video, stopping and starting the video as necessary.

Allow the Permanent Rose glaze, first part of Part Three to naturally dry.

Paint the Permanent Rose glaze/Local Color for Three Orange Tulips (second part of Part Three). While referring to your reference photo, paint as you follow along with the video, stopping and starting the video as necessary.

Allow the Permanent Rose glaze/Local Color, second part of Part Three to naturally dry.

Assignments for Week Four
View Underpainting the Glow: Three Orange Tulips – Part Four, Local Color Video*  {*Note: If you find it laborious to watch every brush stroke, as it is very long, you may fast-forward through the middle-toward-the-end part of the video that is referring to the application of Local Color in the background area (second part of Part Four). There is no audio instruction for this mid-segment of the video, strictly visual but there is audio toward the end.}

Paint the Local Color on your painting, applying the techniques featured in Three Orange Tulips, Part Four. While referring to your reference photo, paint as you follow along with the video, stopping and starting the video as necessary.

Allow the Local Color, Part Four to naturally dry.

 

View the entire syllabus when you register for Cheryle’s course!

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